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ISSUE no. 23 - SUMMER 2016

In this issue of AE, the food chain surfaces; love conquers a little too much; and September scares May to death.

Meanwhile, we release our annual podcast; Wes Smiderle reviews Jeff Lemire; and J.J.S. Boyce surveys tales about animals.

FICTION
Rare Specimen

Scott Shank

It wasn't how the man clawed at empty air, or how he barrel-rolled once, taking in a final 360-degree view of earth and sky. The memory Johanna held onto was of the man's face, painted black as a new moon.

 
Scar Tissue

Brad Preslar

Dee opens her eyes to a dark room. One cheek rests on the cool concrete floor. Inches from her face, a spider web extends from the concrete up to the ceiling. The web shakes.

 
The Trial of M Lazare

Philip Brian Hall

If they’d been prepared to arrest me, I must be assessed as a potentially hostile witness at best; given that the judge had sent gendarmes rather than regular cops he might even suspect me of a major crime.

 
NONFICTION & EDITORIAL
SECOND CONTACTS

J.J.S. Boyce

So what happens after first contact? Leaving aside War of the Worlds scenarios where one race is completely destroyed, after the initial shock, what’s it like five or fifty years into a universe where we know we’re not alone? Human history provides several possible outcomes, ranging from genocide to colonization to occupation to friendship and political alliance to the innocuous missionary outposts or even lone, Marco Polo-like figure, venturing into the unknown.

 
THE HEART GOES LAST by Margaret Atwood

Wes Smiderle

Margaret Atwood has always been wary of the term “science fiction.”

She prefers the label speculative fiction and, in a 2005 column for the Guardian, Atwood described what she considers to be the differences between  the two.

 
COMPANY TOWN by Madeline Ashby

Jonathan Crowe

Lately I’ve been noticing that thriller tropes and sensibilities are turning up more and more in the science fiction field. It occurs to me that a consideration of the thriller mode is a good way to begin our look at Madeline Ashby’s third and latest novel, Company Town.

 

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ISSN: 1925-3141