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ISSUE no. 19 - SUMMER 2015

In this issue of AE, there's more to time travel than meets the eye; love heals all; and old fantasies take flight.

Meanwhile, J.J.S. Boyce reviews the latest by Robert Charles Wilson; Jonathan Crowe surveys Peter Watts's short fiction; and D.F. McCourt revisits Riverworld.

FICTION
Wire Paladin

Stephen S. Power

At first the emails from SearchBot were merely aggravating.

 
You Too Can Travel in Time

Jim Robb

Arvin Wainwright, Minister of Science and Technology for the World Assembly, was not amused by the framed poster on Dr. Peter Anderson’s wall. “Everyone can travel in time,” it read, “but only in one direction.”

 
The Healing Touch

Scott Overton

If Ned Harrison hadn’t just been widowed, he wouldn’t have fallen for the alien.

 
NONFICTION & EDITORIAL
The Antithesis of SF: Helen Marshall’s GIFTS FOR THE ONE WHO CAME AFTER

Dale L. Sproule

We modern entertainment consumers have universes at our fingertips. Over the course of more than a generation, many, if not most, of us have become jaded to spectacles that were awe-inspiring when science fiction started becoming popular in the middle of the 20th century. But the dazzle, the scale, the concepts — none of it is new anymore.

 
The Affinities by Robert Charles Wilson

J.J.S. Boyce

Robert Charles Wilson is back in fine form with his latest novel, perhaps his finest since Spin. In it, he tackles Big Data and social networking, children of our nascent century which have nevertheless quickly grown up together, and brought the world with them.

 
God and the Machines: The Short Fiction of Peter Watts

Jonathan Crowe

The notion that Peter Watts’s work is particularly dark, dystopic or depressing is common enough, but it’s an assessment that could stand some scrutiny. In his afterword to Beyond the Rift, a collection of his short fiction that came out from Tachyon Publications in 2013, Watts himself makes the case that his work, in that it expects better from humanity, is actually optimistic.

 

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ISSN: 1925-3141